Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Kansas Dugout Quilt Part II

.Now, where to start? Maybe with the quilt top:


And so I have almost finished (except for the inset triangles along the edges) sewing together the Kansas Dugout Quilt top.  Yesterday I set myself the target of sewing together the Kansas Dugout blocks into a quilt top.  Little did I know just how much work that task would entail; this was no straight forward "join blocks into rows" and "sew rows together" kind of quilt top. Piecing the blocks was the easy part, joining them together was a whole other story.


I tackled it in sections and then tried not to get too overwhelmed by having to set numerous center squares into the otherwise completed quilt top.  Tricky and fiddly but if you cut and mark the fabric accurately, and take your time with lining up the fabrics it does come together surprisingly well.



My biggest concern now is that I have almost run out of the solid fabric, there's definitely not enough solid fabric left over for the triangles along the outer edges.  And ... it's not a Kona Cotton in Slate after all!  It is close in color but not the same as the FQ I have in my stash.  I am guessing it is an Amy Butler (Free Spirit) solid fabric.


There are other options though and I think I will turn this negative into an opportunity for some more fabric play.  Surely there is something in my stash that will work for the outer triangles? 

Have a wonderful crafty day!
Rita

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41 comments:

  1. Wow! It's so striking! I can't wait to see it when it's all finished.

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  2. It's beautiful! I'm sure you will find something in your stash that will work. Maybe even go with a different color that repeats in the pattern. Good luck!

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  3. It's gorgeous. Really and truly spectacular.

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  4. I had to go back and read to find out what you were talking about... When I looked at the block, I saw individual long diamonds with quarter-square triangles sewn together to make a block (each centre square being made of four QSTs); I had know idea there were so many inset seams! Wow - you are ambitious! As soon as I see insets, I try to break the block down further because they terrify me. :-) Colour me impressed!

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  5. No idea how you did these blocks, but it is quite an interesting quilt! HA!

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  6. Ok, I commented on the last post about this quilt that I had done a similar one (and was working on a second just like you did...must be addictive)

    Here is the pic:

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-4a90bZIY0Rs/TeUiV9N3FBI/AAAAAAAAC3M/WmYdSPv6-do/s1600/IMG_5388.JPG

    5" charms with 2" snowballs on opposite sides. I have never done a Y seam before but if it gave YOU some trouble I know I had better avoid them!

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  7. you know, I betcha the solid is Free Spirit Slate. I just put that in an order for my shop and it looks like it on the screen. :)

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  8. You continue to inspire me! Conrats on the 'almost' finish! Smiles~Beth

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  9. Oooh another fabric for the outer triangles...can't wait! Love the quilt top. I'd love to know your tricks with piecing Y seams.

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  10. I love this quilt! I'm really excited to see what you come up with for the triangles. Honestly, I think the egde looks great as is, but I imagine it would be complicated to finish.

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  11. That is jst so amazing - I am in awe!

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  12. I am pretty sure it is the Amy Butler Slate. I used it for my Yellow and Grey Lady of the Lake quilt. Perhaps you could bind it as is! That would be fantastic (but fiddly).

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  13. Wow that's amazing Rita. I can't even imagine the work to piece all of that together - yeah totally not straight forward piece by row method. Good luck and can't wait to see the finished quilt :)

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  14. Doesn't the red in your blocks just jump out at you? I think you could finish with a solid red and it would make the quilt top POP!

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  15. It has been worth your perseverance, it is an incredible quilt. xo

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  16. I like the shape of it as is! Not the most fun to bind, though

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  17. Surely you will make a shortage of a certain fabric into an even more spectacular creation!

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  18. Amazing. Beautiful. Work of art. Wish I had patience to make a quilt like this. :-)

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  19. once again my mouth has fallen open and I am in awe of your talent!

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  20. Oh it looks so awesome.. I hate HATE it when I run out of fabric so close to the end!! Doh!

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  21. It looks perfect so far - really like the dark background that 'ties' down the colorful fabric. Love it :)

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  22. I love it! Maybe black triangles with thin black border as it appears in the first photos might be the way to go!!

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  23. I am certain you will find an amazing alternative - it would almost be disappointing now if you found some leftover slate in your stash as I am excited to see what you find instead!

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  24. I'm with Meredith ... I'd bind it as it is, it would be such an interesting edge ...

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  25. I have a broad smile on my dial. Prompted by the MEREST notion that YOIUR stash would let you down! Am almost willing to bet my firstborn (although she's a bit of a handful these days)...

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  26. This is a fun one Rita, how about using the same fabric for the edge triangles and binding, it might just create an interesting effect!

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  27. I just love this quilt! Soooo pretty!! I'm always looking for quilts to use in photography sessions and this one is stunning with the range of colors!! LOVE!!

    Hana
    the MomTog Diaries

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  28. I'm sure I'm crazy, but I wish you could leave the edges without filling them. It looks so cool this way!

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  29. So the grey is set into the other fabrics after they are sewn together?

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  30. Your quilts are so gorgeous! I have to say that your aesthetic must be very similar to mine, because I love each one you post here!

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  31. I didn't read all the comments, so this has probably already been suggested - but I think that the outer triangles should be whatever material you choose for the binding. That pic with the background for the edges looks GREAT, and that is what it would look like with a matching outer triangle/binding :) Great job on the quilt top though - I always avoid making quilts with y-seams!

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  32. My first thought for the edge triangles would be red, if you could find a shade that would not match the red prints on the edges - or slate, but a deeper shade that the centers. Great job! I am having a terrible time posting on blogs on which the Comments do not pop up in a separate page.

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  33. Me again - looks like using my AIM ID will not link to me. This is terrible. My blog is http://melrosemiss.blogspot.com and my email is melrosemiss@aol.com.

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  34. wow, it looks wonderful as it is -- have you thought about leaving the edges of the quilt as they are? would make an interesting shape!

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  35. Stunning! I can't wait to see what you come up with for the outside triangles. You have such talent!

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  36. Its simply gorgeous Rita! I love this classic pattern done with more modern fabrics. The solid is a great foil for the other fabrics.

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  37. Great way to use up my scraps, can't wait to get started.

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  38. What about just binding it with this outside edge as is? Unusual and timeconsuming but I think the result would be worthwhile.

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  39. This is a great idea to make use of the scrapes in the stash.

    Thanks SEW as usual for your wonderful ideas.

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  40. I have 2 ideas:

    1. (also mentioned by others) make the edge triangles and binding out of the same fabrics - would really frame it. I'd go for a darker shade of the slate.

    2. Keep the unusual edges for the edge of the quilt. Cut strips of fabric (wider than the missing triangles). After quilting, sew along the seam line. Folding on the seam line, flip to the back and slip stitch to the backing. This is a great way to do scalloped edges without bias binding too.

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