Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Quilts As You Go - Patchwork Bags!

I made a bag! And I loved making it.
I have made many quilts, some pillow covers with zippers, as well as a few zippered  pouches and that is about the extent of my sewing experience and exposure to various techniques.  I tentatively like the idea of stepping outside of my sewing comfort zone and even have grandiose plans to one day sew clothing but .... One step at a time.


Browsing Craftsy I stumbled upon Tara Rebman's - Quilt-As-You-Go: Patchwork Bags online class.  This bag - the Tinker Tote -  is made as part of the class using several techniques that I am already familiar with ( such as quilt-as-you-go and patchwork) as well as techniques and products - like interfacing -  which are new to me, and so this was a good transition class for me.  Nothing too daunting.
I purchased the class several weeks ago and have since been sourcing the required materials including a magnetic snap, Decor Bond by Pellon and a fruitless search for Utility Cloth which just doesn't exist in Australia (and which I substituted with a linen/cotton blend fabric slightly heavier than quilting cotton).  Prior to making the bag I spent quite some time watching the class just to familiarize myself with the bag making process.  I again watched the online class as I was making the bag, repeating lessons when needed and carefully watching Tara in action.
The bag is fully lined, with an option for two different style pockets one of which is a zippered pocket hidden in the lining of the bag.  A heavy/firm iron-on interfacing is used to stabilize the bag and the corners of the bags are boxed. The edges of the bag are finished with bias binding with an second option for a hidden binding.
The online class was very comprehensive. Tara showed every step of the process, and made a whole bag from scratch during the class.  The trickiest (most fiddly) part was attaching the bias binding, but it is a technique with which I am familiar, and not unlike binding a quilt but with awkward curves.


The back of my bag (pictured above) is made using the Quilt As You Go technique.  I wasn't immediately taken with the look of this bag panel and made the other side of the bag in a more traditional patchwork style (pictured below) which I spray basted onto the batting and then quilted as a whole (rather than quilt as you go).  Now that the bag is finished I actually really like the Quilt as You Go side, maybe even prefer it!


MY NOTES:
  • The Tinker Tote pattern forms part of Tara Rebman's Quilt-As-You-Go: Patchwork Bags  online class.
  • the fabrics used are Flea Market Fancy and Katie Jump Rope by Denyse Schmidt.  Feature fabric is Echino Decoro by Etsuko Furuya - Buck in Black
  • I used a 14mm Magnetic Snap (the only size available at my local store).  A larger snap - 18mm diameter - is probably a better size for this tote.
  • There seems to be no equivalent of Utility Cloth in Australia.  Utility Cloth is used as an additional  bag lining which I have substituted  with a handkerchief linen.  If I were to make this bag again I would probably substitute the Utility Cloth with a light weight canvas fabric for a firmer finish - a personal preference only.

I always enjoy time spent tinkering about with fabric and sewing but this project was a little different for me and I had the most wonderful time making it.  I am already planning another!

Thank you for stopping by,
Rita

RELEVANT LINKS:
Craftsy
Tara Rebman's - Quilt-As-You-Go: Patchwork Bags

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44 comments:

  1. I'm in the US, I would use a canvas or duck cloth for "utility cloth". I've never seen a fabric labeled 'utility cloth' in the store. Perhaps it means a sturdy fabric which can be used as a stabilizer or interfacing or to give the bag body. I just made Elizabeth Hartman's sewing tote bag. She used canvas/duck cloth to give the tote body--I loved working with it and the results were beautiful.

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    1. Thank you! Like Rita, I am an Australian who has never heard of 'utility cloth' in 30 years of sewing. I probably would have guessed something like calico or cotton drill - useful but not pretty.

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  2. I bought an watched this class too! And you've just reminded me I really need to make one at least!

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  3. SO cute!!
    I've never made a bag

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  4. Love making bags - your first is amazing - of course!!!

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  5. When I did a QAYG Weekender I used artist canvas scraps as the backing, it gives a lovely shape. Beautiful work as always!

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  6. I purchased this class on craftsy. I have watched it once. I need my life to slow down so I can make it. I love yours.

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  7. You did a lovely bag. Enjoy it

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  8. I purchased the class on Crafsty as well and already have the fabrics picked....your Bloggers Choice Fat Quarter Bundle. Hope to make it this fall. Thanks for the tips.

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  9. This bag is gorgeous, can't wait to get my new sewing machine

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  10. wow! Rita! gorgeous bag! really everything you touch is fabulous!! even new experiences!

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  11. ohhhhh, very, very beautiful !!!
    congratulations !!!!

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  12. As soon as I saw the straps of the bag, I knew it was Tara's pattern! I was lucky enough to win one of them at a class in Fort Collins and I love it! Perfect for a regular purse but big enough to be my diaper bag.

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  13. Isn't great to try something new! Especially when it turns out as well as your bag! Congratulations!
    Looking forward to seeing your next bag.

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  14. oh this is a delisicious looking bag. Love the fabrics used.. It is very modern looking.

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  15. Thanks for the comments ....I wasn't sure whether to sign up for the class but now I will! Love your bag!

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  16. Isn´t fabulous try something new and enjoy doing it?Your bag looks spectacular!

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  17. Well done. You will catch the bag making bug!

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  18. What a fantastic version of this bag! I love the different-sized dots on the binding and the bottom and closure strap. Also it's got sort of a buck on a buckle. :-)

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  19. Gorgeous bag Rita, I have enrolled in this class also and so appreciate your tips. Thanks for sharing! Have a great day ............Marie (mlismore@optusnet.com.au)

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  20. Congratulations for stepping outside of your box. It's wonderful.

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  21. This bag is darling! I want to make one in a beach bag size!

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  22. Great bag Rita and thanks for the class review, I have wondered what that class was like.

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  23. Looks Great! And totally "you"!

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  24. Amazing bag!!! Where is that cool deer print from?

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  25. Such a cute bag! LOVE your choice of flap fabric.

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  26. Your bindings are inspired, and the fabric you used to bind this bag is no exception! When it comes to finishing your quilts and other projects, you are my role model.

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  27. Rita Rita Rita...do you NOT do anything well? This bag is so beautiful. I love everything bout it especially the fussy cut deer on the snap. So adorable!

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  28. What a cute bag! I remember these bags from when I was a kid. My mom used to make them out of leather for the workman at the shop my dad owned. No bias binding need for a leather bag...but if you cut your fabric on the bias for the binding it should be very easy to put on. What a nice reminder of an old idea! Nice surprise reading your blog his AM.

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  29. Go Rita. Gorgeous bag...and I look forward to seeing many more from you. This is exactly the class I had lined up for my first plunge into Craftsy myself.

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  30. I had never seen this bag before and love your version! I'm thinking I might give it a go! (ie. I bought the class, not just need the time...) ;-)

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  31. It is gorgeous Rita! You made a bag - OMG - that would be stepping outside all sorts of comfort zones for me!

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  32. What an awesome bag! I love it!!

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  33. this is SO crazy! Love the bag - it looks SO similar to a bag that I made over a year ago (on my flickr here http://www.flickr.com/photos/31110202@N02/7664295770/in/photostream ) ...... wondering how long the pattern has been out? hehe :) I just made my pattern up when I made mine, but I only did a simple lining, no pockets.

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  34. Love your bag. Absolutely gorgeous. And perfect for me today, as I was just sitting down to make the Tinker Tote. So happy to see your version.

    Just a note with regard to the utility cloth - in the U.S., utility cloth is sometimes called Cotton Duck, or Duck Cloth, and it is very much like a medium weight canvas.

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  35. I also took the class. I made the bag and so far everyone that has seen it wants one. I loved the class and would recommend it. My only advice would be to take your time and don't try any short cuts. Rewatch the videos! Have fun too!

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  36. Just love it....I have the class just not have had the time. I use duck cloth when it refers to utility maybe that is what they are referring too. Thanks for giving so many of us that shove to maybe get er' done.

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  37. What a gorgeous bag ... nicely done!

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  38. Hi Rita, i just bought the Tinker Tote class. I have no idea what utility cloth is and I am sure we don't have it here down under. What did you use instead for your bags?

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    1. Hi Jeannie - Utility cloth is very similar to Duck Cloth; not that I was able to find either. I used a double layer of Essex Linen and was happy with the form of the bag.

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