Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Neutral Study Quilt II ~ A Custom Quilt

It's been a world of Log Cabin Blocks here! 

Over the last week or so I have made 80 Log Cabin blocks for a custom quilt order that will eventually be heading all the way to Ireland.  (This quilt is based on the original Neutral Study Quilt made in May 2012.  See this previous blog post for all the details of the original quilt:  Neutral Study Quilt)

What I have learned is that I am super slow at piecing log cabins.  I like to press (and trim) each log as I go and then choose the next fabric/log.  Without taking over the whole house, I am unable to set myself up to ensure a more efficient flow of work, and as such I got up from behind my sewing machine, let's see ... 


80 Log Cabin Blocks
8 logs/seams for each block
piecing two blocks at a time:
I got up to press and trim: 320 times!
(and it felt like:  2000 times)

Once all 80 log cabin blocks were completed the quilt top came together effortlessly.  I am keen to get started on the quilting.  Let's hope I can push through the usual basting procrastination phase quickly this time.

More soon,
Rita
RELEVANT LINKS:

28 comments:

  1. Beautiful! And quite the workout with all those trips up from the sewing machine. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I LOVE the way this is turning out! Very,very nice indeed. I have my sewing machine in a corner of the living room, my cutting area on the kitchen table, and my ironing board over by one of the bedrooms - I call it my work(out) triangle!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Love this quilt! you sound like me...up, down, up, down!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. lovely. Particlarly love the bright coloured centres

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thank you for sharing! i like your comment on the logistics of the piecing process. Sewing and ironing one by one is not easy.
    Great work !!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Do love this quilt and it just might have given me the inspiration to make one for a friend who doesn't like too much colour. Sounds like the making of this quilt has given you quite the workout!

    ReplyDelete
  7. It is a workout! My cutting table is downstairs, so I do make a lot of trips up and down.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Very, very pretty! This is one of my favorites. Elegant looking. Sorry for theinconvenience of ironing. Mine is closer but I still need to stand.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Sou como você,é um tal de senta e levanta que aja joelhos.Parabéns está linda.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Your piecing is always beautifully perfect, now we know why!

    ReplyDelete
  11. It's looking so pretty. I can't wait to see it completed.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Ironing and trimming after every log really pays, the blocks are so incredibly precise. A beautiful quilttop!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Very pretty! I'm supremely slow when it comes to log cabin quilts for the exact same reason. And I rarely make 80 blocks! Yikes!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Just think of all the money that you save not having a gym membership! You must be in great shape! Maybe a pressing buddy would be helpful. . . you know- you sew, they press or vice versa. Lovely quilt and well worth the effort.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Pinning instead of basting might save you some time. I have all these bright coloured squares I was wondering what to do with. I love this quilt and will make it.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Pinning instead of basting might save you some time. I have all these bright coloured squares I was wondering what to do with. I love this quilt and will make it.

    ReplyDelete
  17. you should get a pedometer and I am sure you will be amazed at how many steps you take in the course of one quilt. Do you think we could then make it an official Olympic sport if it entails so much exercise? ha ha

    ReplyDelete
  18. So pretty! It has a look of "modern" while using a very traditional pattern (log cabin). I'm thinking about making one similar to this for my daughter because she & her husband like the modern look.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hi Rita! It may be a lot of up and down, but your precision is one of the your quilts are so lovely. Whenever I have to do a lot of pressing as I go, I set the ironing board to the right of my machine (you would put it to your left) and lower it to table height. Then I just turn and press without getting up.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Another beautiful quilt! When I first started quilting, I too had space issues. I bought a wooden TV tray and used a staple gun to cover it with a piece of a padded ironing board cover. That way, with an iron and a small cutting mat beside me, I didn't have to get up and down so much. An added bonus was that the whole thing folded up and stored behind the bedroom door when not in use.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I am in love! So restful, but w pops of color. I think I would have made this courthouse steps style, w precut pieces to chain piece. This looks a little like my Hot Summer quilt, a wonky log cabin, but the effect is much calmer. http://m.flickr.com/#/photos/62072073@N08/7432073716/

    ReplyDelete
  22. beautiful! My ironing board lowers/raises, so I, too, set it at 30" and placed it perpendicular to my sewing table - I just turn in my chair (I also press seams as I go...)

    ReplyDelete
  23. am sure the buyer will be delighted...it's absolutely stunning Rita...one of my faves of yours I thinkg

    ReplyDelete
  24. That looks like the makings of another fab quilt! I love how your pictures make everything so bright and full of colour =D

    ReplyDelete
  25. Beautiful. I love these quilts so much. I have my ironing board set up in my office, so I have to get up and go to the next room with each seam. I count it as my exercise...

    ReplyDelete
  26. You may have outdone yourself with this one! Wow....a perfect combination of color pop....and subtle neutrals....Gorgeous....No wonder I look forward to visiting you so often.

    Susan

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for stopping by and leaving a comment!

Feel free to ask questions and I will answer either here or by email, as is appropriate.